Risk-Averse Travel Tactics

Risk-Adverse Travel Tactics

Traveling takes you away from the comforts of home but allows you to experience new surroundings. In order to fully enjoy your time away from home, how do you plan for a trip to minimize any issues? I have compiled a list of the things that I do in order to have a worry-less vacation. This includes taking risk-averse travel tactics to minimize any surprises. 

There are many things necessary to get together before actually starting the trip. This process is amplified for my household (hubs and me) because we are very particular about every detail of our experience. When we plan for a trip, I take the lead in the process which could take upwards of a couple of months of off-and-on planning to finalize.

From the itinerary to the timing, and everything in-between – there’s a place for it on my to-do list. In order to enjoy the trip that may come around once a year, I carefully manage all aspects that are under my control.

Risk-Averse Travel Tactics


Here Are My Risk-Adverse Travel Tactics, Divulged


Pre-Trip

  • Doing Research

I do my research via TripAdvisor and Yelp. All hotels, activities, and restaurants need to be highly rated and the reviews need to align with the experience that I am seeking. If I plan on spending extra money on a nice restaurant then it should live up to my standards. There is a considerably higher chance of a good experience if there have been proper vetting procedures. Yes, I’m so serious about this!

One of the only splurges I will do for a trip is the hotel. I go first on the ratings and reviews, and second on price. I won’t spend over a certain amount on a hotel, though it is still the highest cost of the trip. Why? It adds to the travel experience when the hotel has exceptional customer service, a top-notch location, and great accommodations.

For instance, if anyone has ever been to Seattle, the best hotel to stay at is right in the heart of Pike’s Place Market. I have fond memories of my second visit to this lovely city, based in large part to the hotel experience.

  • Scheduling Reservations And Activities

During my research, if there is an activity, event, meal, or even a certain amount of exploration time, it gets scheduled. A reservation is made and either noted or printed. This past summer when I visited NYC, one of the excursions we did was a night boat tour on the Hudson River. Ya know, the normal touristy things. When I scheduled this activity, it gave me mixed messages as to how I could redeem the tickets.

Due to this, I decided to email the company. This assured me that I would receive actual feedback from one of the representatives of the company. If something happened that would necessitate it, I would have an email message as backup. The activity went off without a hitch – except it being a crowded vessel. Those are the circumstances that I cannot control at this point. This is where off-peak travel sounds SOOO nice.

  • Backup Plans

Have you ever shown up somewhere on your trip and found that it is temporarily closed? I tend to see this with restaurants in particular, so I make sure I have backup plans. If it is a restaurant I am really excited to try, I will sometimes take it a step further by giving the establishment a call to confirm availability.

Let’s say you end up on the opposite end of town for some reason and you need restaurants for that area. I make a list for possible backup options for each area of the city that I plan to spend any amount of time.

You may be asking, why not use Yelp when that happens? You definitely could do that, but I just choose to add a few extra places to my list, ya know just in case.

  • Knowing Your Transport Options

Are you renting a car or taking public transit? In order to understand the transit system in the location you are visiting, saving an area or public transit map is helpful. I’m terribly bad at directions (maybe I should add this to my list to master?), so my husband knows that one of the travel areas he is responsible for is getting familiar with the public transit system – prior to the trip. This means locating stops next to the hotel, stops for our activities, and other areas that may be of interest.

Sometimes it doesn’t matter how much you plan in advance, determinations can only be made once you get there. We have found ourselves relying on Uber and Lyft an increasing extent during our more recent vacations, but only if it makes sense at the time. It’s so much more convenient!

  • Creating Checklists

If you tend to be forgetful like me, this is just a must in life – having checklists. I have checklists for everything, so it’s not any different for travel. This list ensures I have the essentials – it can range from a charging cord to my favorite pair of socks. The checklist also includes areas of the home that need tending to prior to the trip.

Let’s face it – the things I am likely to forget may never be as extreme as what happened in the “Home Alone” movie. Though, not having the things you need may put a damper on the trip that a checklist could have easily prevented.

  • Preparing For Data Usage

Clearing my phone data and ensuring there is enough storage for pictures. This has become a recent necessity that I discovered when I visited Paris. I could barely take video and pictures because my storage was overloaded!

  • Informing The Right People

If it’s necessary, I’ll inform the people who need to know about my trip in terms of the bank and credit card companies. This is a must when traveling internationally, as the banks will reject your request for funds if you don’t notify them first.

Risk-Adverse Travel Tactics

During Trip

  • Primarily Using Carry-On Luggage

I have willingly checked baggage twice. Unless I am flying international on a longer timeline, I try to never check baggage. It’s a major hassle that does not add to my enjoyment of traveling. Due to this, I always try to use carry-on luggage – 1 for me, and 1 for my husband. This is enough for our usual 5-6 day trips within the United States. When flying internationally, I might do just fine with 2 carry-ons for a shorter time horizon, but the last trip length to Paris was 9 days. Of course, my first time in Paris meant I needed all of my cutest outfits. Right?!

  • Always Being Aware Of Timing

I always try to account for the time needed to be somewhere, whether it be the airport, activities, or dinner. I’m always on time or early. What’s worse than missing your flight? Ding, ding, I know – missing your flight because it’s your fault you didn’t pay attention to the time. This is why I account for delays by showing up at the airport at least 2.5 hours ahead of time. The recommended time is 2 hours, but I always prefer to have a buffer.

  • Securing Belongings

What’s worse than missing your flight? That might be – missing one of your belongings. I am always proactive in trying to ensure that I have all my possessions accounted for and secure. Important documents such as passports are always within reach and never left behind in the hotel room.

  • Saving Receipts

I collect receipts for two purposes. First, it helps with the last tip in this article. Secondly, for sentimental reasons and because I want to have access to certain information. I’ve had discussions in the past and wondered where exactly I did/ate/ordered something, and it just helps to have backup for this. Nowadays, certain receipts can be sent directly to email, which adds to the convenience factor.

Risk-Adverse Travel Tactics

Post-Trip

  • Moving Photos To A Backup File

So, you traveled all across the globe, and had once-in-a-lifetime experiences, but then you forget to move the photos from your phone to a backup file.  Subsequently, the phone falls, breaks, and the tangible memories are GONE. At this point, did you really travel to ____, ____, and ____? Hey, I believe you…

I procrastinate, trust me, but I take tons of photos because I know that my memory will give way at some point in time – where photos may be the one thing to bring the memory back to me. Due to this, I find the time to back up the photos in a couple of different places to ensure that I have done everything I can to protect them.

  • Reviewing Credit And Debit Card Activity

And here we are, the final tactic to ensure the trip went according to plan. Being mainly a personal finance blogger, I would be inept to not add this final task that happens to be a big deal.

Reviewing credit and debit activity is always a must when returning from a trip. Though you may have been extra careful with your cards out there in the city you were visiting – it’s always a good idea to check this information when returning home. There are a couple of reasons why.

  1. When you visit a restaurant and leave a tip on your credit or debit card, it does not register until a few days later. Reviewing the activity and comparing it to your actual receipts can catch any undue errors.
  2. E-pickpocketing can run rampant all over the world, and unless you have RFID protection (and sometimes even if you do), unsolicited charges can wreak havoc while you are out and about on your trip.

Risk-Averse Travel TacticsIn Review

Now that you have my full list of travel tactics to employ – what are you waiting for?  Rest assured, if you have an itinerary and plan for any potential issues, then your travel can be spent enjoying the sights and the local eats that you have traveled a long way to experience.  Remember, one of the best parts about traveling is that you bring back life-long memories. Consider these risk-adverse travel tactics for your next trip both regionally or abroad. Safe travels….!

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Readers, do you have anything that you do in order to prepare for a trip to avoid foreseeable complications? If so, please share in the comments below!


Original photo credit: Pixabay

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5 thoughts on “Risk-Averse Travel Tactics

  1. Its funny you mention the splurging on Hotel… Ive usually been lucky with hotels. My wife used to do accounting for hotels so I got great prices for great hotels… After she quit, we’ve been using points so thankfully I haven’t paid for hotel stays too often. But we were going to Puerto Rico, and I was trying to book several rooms for myself and my family so I went through Hotwire.

    Hotwire has that Hotrate option that doesn’t tell you where you’re staying, which has actually worked out for us here. But the hotel we got in Puerto Rico was atrocious… The rooms looked like closets that hadn’t been painted in a while. The whole feel of the hotel was horrible… Not only did we purchase the Hotwire rooms, we agreed to go to another hotel because no one liked the one we rented and paid for that as well. While trying to save money we ended up spending like $350 a night…

    I guess the point is, splurge when you need to on vacation to make it enjoyable! You’re already spending money, might as well make sure you actually enjoy it by doing your research beforehand.

    1. That Puerto Rico incident – man, I would have booked it out there SOOO fast. Ha, I made an effort to look for an Accounting position in the travel industry for flight + hotel discounts. Though, I don’t know how fun it would be to have free standby flights working full-time.

      Splurging on hotels makes sense now when I’m traveling maybe once or twice a year…maybe not so much later on. But, what I am looking forward to is off-peak travel and being able to plan for far in advance. That’s where you really see the differences in pricing.

  2. Wow this is super thorough! I’m stressing about our upcoming trip to Hawaii so this will help. I like to be super prepared too but my husband is a bit more ‘go with the flow’ so it’s a little hard to adjust to being more ‘go with the flow’ lol.

    1. Hi! I haven’t been to Hawaii yet, otherwise I would give you some good info. In retirement if I end up traveling a lot more, I will probably try to go with the flow more on some aspects just because it would too much to plan everything all the time.

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